• 55719bd26c9446ef03af1bee0f82c851

Texas Style Bbq Beef Short Rib

Delicious ribbies

Prep
Cook
Serves 4people
Ingredients
beef short rib
salt
vegetable oil
stevie's rib rub
cherry wood for smoking
coleslaw
bbq sauce
Directions
1.
Begin by removing the fat and the very tough silverskin from the top of the meat. All of it. No need to remove the membrane from the exposed side of the bones as you do with pork ribs. If you do the meat can fall off. Then cut slabs into individual bones or double bones if they did not come cut up. You can cook them in a slab, but they take a lot longer, and for Texas style, I like to expose more surface to heat to tenderize and develop brown Maillard reaction flavors. Inevitably some bones in a package have little meat and lotta fat. Trim them anyhow and cook them.
2.
Salt the meat in advance, up to 24 hours if possible. Lightly coat the meat with vegetable oil so the oil soluble spices in the rub will dissolve and penetrate a bit. Flavor the meat with a rub that contains salt but very little sugar. Try my Big Bad Beef Rub (best to use Stevie's rib rub). Lawry's Seasoned Salt is good too. Meathead's Memphis Dust is too sweet. Do the tops and sides, and coat them generously. If you can, let the rub sit on the meat in the refrigerator for an hour or three or even overnight.
3.
If you wish, you can tenderize the meat with Jaccard. The narrow blades sever long tough strands and do a pretty good job. I normally do not recommend this tool because, if there is contamination on the surface of the meat, the blades can drive the bugs into the center and they will not be killed at 130F, medium rare. But at 180°F the meat is pasteurized through and through.
4.
Setup your cooker for indirect cooking and preheat to 225°F, hot enough to kill bacteria but not too high to evaporate all the moisture.
5.
Put the meat on, bone side down, and add the wood. Oak is traditional in Texas and it makes sense because it is mild, but other woods work fine. I like cherry. Beef ribs seem to absorb smoke more quickly than other cuts, so remember, as always, go easy on the wood on your first cook. Too much smoke will ruin the meal. Add no more than 2 to 4 ounces on a tight cooker, double that if it leaks a lot. Put the lid on.
6.
You will not need to add more wood and you will not need to turn the meat over. Cook bone down all the way. Keep the lid on and resist peeking until about 3/4 of the way through the cook, based on the guide below. The exact length of the cook depends on variables such as the composition of the meat (each steer is different), and if you chose Texas style or the Chicago style.
7.
1" thick meat should hit 180°F in about 3 hours.
8.
5" thick meat should hit 180°F in about 3.5 hours.
9.
2" thick meat should hit 180°F in about 4 hours.
10.
Skip the sauce. A lot of folks like barbecue sauce on everything they grill, but sweet tomato based sauce just clashes with smoky beef. Save it for pork. I serve my beef ribs nekked. If you must use a sauce, try what they use in Texas, a thin beef stock based sauce, like my Texas Barbecue Mop-Sauce.
11.
Serve with Grannie's Texas Beans and your favorite coleslaw

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